THE BUSINESS OF VISCOSITY BLOG



    Why Can’t I Get a Reliable Viscosity Measurement on My Thixotropic Fluid with a Zahn Cup? – Part III

    Posted by Mike Bonner

    Aug 13, 2019 4:14:00 PM

    In Part II of this series, we continued our discussion on viscosity by tackling the topic of thixotropy.  With this defined, we can now circle back to bring it all together and show how different measurement methods produce different results and how our measurement choices can actually work against us.

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    Topics: Zahn cups, Efflux Cups, fluid process control, viscometers, viscometry, non-newtonian fluids

    Why Can’t I Get a Reliable Viscosity Measurement on My Thixotropic Fluid with a Zahn Cup? – Part II

    Posted by Mike Bonner

    Aug 6, 2019 3:38:00 PM

    In Part I of this series, we examined some of the issues with the viscosity cup measurement process and started to look at the fundamentals of fluid viscosity as a means of explaining the source of those problems.  In this installment, we pick up the discussion with a somewhat difficult topic:  thixotropy.

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    Topics: Zahn cups, Efflux Cups, fluid process control, viscometers, viscometry, non-newtonian fluids

    Why Can’t I Get a Reliable Viscosity Measurement on My Thixotropic Fluid with a Zahn Cup? – Part I

    Posted by Mike Bonner

    Jul 30, 2019 10:28:00 AM

    Manufacturers who dispense fluids in their process (i.e. – paints and coatings, sealers and adhesives, potting compounds and encapsulants, etc.) all understand that the viscosity of that fluid is fundamental to the process out

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    Topics: Zahn cups, Efflux Cups, fluid process control, viscometers, viscometry, non-newtonian fluids

    Viscometers vs. Rheometers: What’s the Difference?

    Posted by Mike Bonner

    Nov 23, 2017 3:00:00 PM

    When you’re looking to purchase a viscometer to help you maintain proper viscosity in your printing, coating, or painting processes, you may come across another category of viscosity measuring devices known as rheometers. Rheometers are similar in principle to viscometers, but they tend to be more expensive. Part of the reason for this is that they have a much broader range of applications.

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    Topics: Viscosity, viscometers, Viscometer Series, rheometry, viscometry, rheology

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